Charlton House for your wedding venue - SWPP presents wedding venues directory

Wedding Venue Greenwich England

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18th February 2019 GMT

Charlton House

Wedding Venue - Greenwich
Charlton House
Charlton Road
Greenwich
London
SE7 8RE
England

tel:- +44 20 8856 3951
fax:- +44 20 8856 4162
web address:- www.greenwich.gov.uk
e-mail:- charlton.house@greenwich.gov.uk

Charlton House :-
Venue licensed for civil partnership or wedding ceremonies
Venue type - Church

Number of function rooms available for weddings: 3

Function room names and capacities:

Old Library - Reception
Long Gallery - Ceremony
Grand Salon - Ceremony / Drinks Reception

Garden suitable for marquees: No

Local accommodation:

Holiday Inn - Bexley
Holiday Inn - Greenwich
Clarendon - Blackheath

Dance Floor - Yes
Evening Reception Facilities - Yes
Car Parking Facilities - Yes

Wedding services provided: Room hire with tables & chairs, dedicated caterers called Relish, wedding sterward

Gardens or outside locations suitable for wedding photography: Walled gardens outside (not private)

Suitable locations inside the venue for wedding photography: Many original features within the house such as Old Staircase and magnificent fireplaces

Venue special features: Original features within the house such as Old Staircase, strapwork ceiling and fireplaces.

Venue History: Charlton House illustrates a phase in the evolution of the English country house, linking the sprawling style of the Tudor age with the compact geometrical character associated with Inigo Jones. The original oak staircase remains, as do many fireplaces and plasterwork ceilings.
The house overlooks Charlton Park and offers a wide variety of accommodation. The Grand Salon, the Long Gallery and the Old Library are suitable for civil partnership or wedding ceremonies, private functions and conferences.
Three hundred years ago John Evelyn, the diarist, described the prospect from Charlton House as one of the most noble in the world, for city, river, ships, meadows, hills, woods and all other amenities.

The Growth of industry on both sides of the river and the development of flats nearer to Charlton House, over the years, changed the view offered to visitors to the house.
The imaginative visitor to the village, Charlton House and Charlton s historic church can still capture something of an earlier age and recognise one of London s true villages. No imagination is required however to see with Charlton House one of the finest specimens of Jacobean domestic architecture in the country. It illustrates a phase in the evolution of the English country house, linking the sprawling style of the Tudor age with the compact geometrical character associated with Inigo Jones. The architect is unknown but it is attributed to John Thorpe.
Charlton House was built between 1607 and 1612 for Prince Henry, Sir Adam Newton, Dean of Durham. Newton was tutor to Prince Henry, eldest son of James I. Evelyn, who was well acquainted with Newton's son, stated that the House was built for Prince Henry; Newton, however, ceased to be the Prince's tutor in 1610; the Prince Henry died in 1612 at the age of eighteen and so never saw the house completed, so that it is unlikely that the house was at any time a royal residence. Newton probably intended it to be what it became, a "nest for his old age".

Newton continued in the employment of the King and to live in the house until his death in 1629. He is buried in Charlton Church where there is a large monument, commemorating both Adam Newton and his wife Katherine Puckering, in black and white marble. The estate passed to his son Sir Henry Puckering Newton, who as a royalist, had to leave Charlton during the Civil War although his family continued to reside at Charlton House.

In 1658 the estate was purchased by Sir William Duice of who made additions and improvements to the house. He lived at Charlton House in great style.

Sir William Langhorne was a wealthy East India merchant who purchased the estate from William Ducie in 1680. When he died without children in 1715 it passed to his nephew Sir John Conyers. It continued through Sir Baldwin Conyers (died 1731), William Langhorne Garnes, Margaret Maryon, Rev John Maryon and Margaret Maria Weller (died 1777). On Margaret wellers death the property passed to her daughter Jane wife of Sir Thomas Spencer Wilson. One of their daughters, Jane married Spencer Perceval. He Became Prime Minister in 1809 and in 1812 he was assassinated in the House of Commons, our only Prime Minister to suffer this fate. He is buried in Charlton Church. When Jane Wilson died the House went to her son Sir Thomas Maryon-Wilson and thereafter descended in a direct line to Sir Spencer Maryon-Wilson.

It was Sir Spencer Maryon-Wilson who sold the estate to the Council in 1925. Part of the estate was converted to a public park, part was taken over by the London County Council to form a playing field and athletic track and this is how it is today. The House was used for a while as a museum and, following the restoration work carried out on war damage to the north wing, it became a community centre. The extension that was designed in 1877 by Norman Shaw was used as a public library until a few years ago when it was moved into the main buildings.

Charlton House is built of the red brick characteristic of the period, relieved with white stone quoins and dressings. Its shape is that of a shallow H, an oblong with slightly projecting cross pieces at each end. Externally, the chief features are the richly decorated porch which stands in a bay projecting from the middle of the west front. Internally the house is remarkable for the plaster-work of the ceilings, the numerous interesting chimney-pieces, and the staircase.

The porch admits to the hall which extends the full depth of the House. It is a beautifully proportioned room, two storeys high and panelled for half its height. At the west end is a gallery, the design of flat strap-work on the ceiling is noteworthy. Above the east door can be seen the Prince of Wales Plumes.

The principal oak staircase is original, with rectangular well, and heavily moulded bandrail and balustrade. The strap-work and decoration becomes more ornate as you reach the second floor and the principle rooms. On the ground floor, each of the doorways to the Chapel and Wilson Room (originally a dinning room) bears twelve panels and at their heads have the crest of Newton (a bore s head) and Puckering (a Stag).

Above the hall, identical in area, is the Grand Salon. Here the ceiling is enriched by pendants at some of the intersection, with a large pendant in the centre. In the west bay can be seen the initials J.R (James) and other royal devices, including the Royal Stuart Arms. Balancing this treatment, the east bays show the Prince of Wales features, the Garter and the motto Ich Dien . The marble fireplace is flanked by the figures of Vulcan and Venus.

Adjoining the Grand Salon are the Dutch Room and the White Room. The ceiling of the Dutch Room is panelled and the Friezes is modelled with foliage, fruit and jewels. The chimney-piece is of black marble. The White Room on the other side of the Grand Salon has an interesting fireplace and over mantel. The frieze above the fireplace has two subjects, the triumph of Christ and the triumph of Death. The figures in the three projections represent Piety, Mercy and Peace. The oval panel in the centre of the over mantel shows Pegasus and Perseus with the head of Modusa Pegasus. The White Room leads into the seventy foot Long Gallery. The frieze bears a design of foliage, dogs and masks, and the bold strap work of the ceiling is varied with three lozenge-shaped panels.

Alternations have been made over the years, both inside and out, by all of the owners. The original chimneys are no longer there having been replaced by mock Tudor ones. The stables block used to be of three parts now there are only two, the two remaining being are currently used as council offices. The garden house, thought to be designed by Inigo Jones, at one time used as public conveniences, is now empty.

Charlton House illustrates a phase in the evolution of the English country house, linking the sprawling style of the Tudor age with the compact geometrical character associated with Inigo Jones. The original oak staircase remains, as do many fireplaces and plasterwork ceilings. The house overlooks Charlton Park and offers a wide variety of accommodation. The Grand Salon, the Long Gallery and the Old Library are suitable for civil partnership or wedding ceremonies, private functions and conferences.
Three hundred years ago John Evelyn, the diarist, described the prospect from Charlton House as one of the most noble in the world, for city, river, ships, meadows, hills, woods and all other amenities.

The Growth of industry on both sides of the river and the development of flats nearer to Charlton House, over the years, changed the view offered to visitors to the house.
The imaginative visitor to the village, Charlton House and Charlton s historic church can still capture something of an earlier age and recognise one of London s true villages. No imagination is required however to see with Charlton House one of the finest specimens of Jacobean domestic architecture in the country. It illustrates a phase in the evolution of the English country house, linking the sprawling style of the Tudor age with the compact geometrical character associated with Inigo Jones. The architect is unknown but it is attributed to John Thorpe.
Charlton House was built between 1607 and 1612 for Prince Henry, Sir Adam Newton, Dean of Durham. Newton was tutor to Prince Henry, eldest son of James I. Evelyn, who was well acquainted with Newton's son, stated that the House was built for Prince Henry; Newton, however, ceased to be the Prince's tutor in 1610; the Prince Henry died in 1612 at the age of eighteen and so never saw the house completed, so that it is unlikely that the house was at any time a royal residence. Newton probably intended it to be what it became, a "nest for his old age".

Newton continued in the employment of the King and to live in the house until his death in 1629. He is buried in Charlton Church where there is a large monument, commemorating both Adam Newton and his wife Katherine Puckering, in black and white marble. The estate passed to his son Sir Henry Puckering Newton, who as a royalist, had to leave Charlton during the Civil War although his family continued to reside at Charlton House.

In 1658 the estate was purchased by Sir William Duice of who made additions and improvements to the house. He lived at Charlton House in great style.

Sir William Langhorne was a wealthy East India merchant who purchased the estate from William Ducie in 1680. When he died without children in 1715 it passed to his nephew Sir John Conyers. It continued through Sir Baldwin Conyers (died 1731), William Langhorne Garnes, Margaret Maryon, Rev John Maryon and Margaret Maria Weller (died 1777). On Margaret wellers death the property passed to her daughter Jane wife of Sir Thomas Spencer Wilson. One of their daughters, Jane married Spencer Perceval. He Became Prime Minister in 1809 and in 1812 he was assassinated in the House of Commons, our only Prime Minister to suffer this fate. He is buried in Charlton Church. When Jane Wilson died the House went to her son Sir Thomas Maryon-Wilson and thereafter descended in a direct line to Sir Spencer Maryon-Wilson.

It was Sir Spencer Maryon-Wilson who sold the estate to the Council in 1925. Part of the estate was converted to a public park, part was taken over by the London County Council to form a playing field and athletic track and this is how it is today. The House was used for a while as a museum and, following the restoration work carried out on war damage to the north wing, it became a community centre. The extension that was designed in 1877 by Norman Shaw was used as a public library until a few years ago when it was moved into the main buildings.

Charlton House is built of the red brick characteristic of the period, relieved with white stone quoins and dressings. Its shape is that of a shallow H, an oblong with slightly projecting cross pieces at each end. Externally, the chief features are the richly decorated porch which stands in a bay projecting from the middle of the west front. Internally the house is remarkable for the plaster-work of the ceilings, the numerous interesting chimney-pieces, and the staircase.

The porch admits to the hall which extends the full depth of the House. It is a beautifully proportioned room, two storeys high and panelled for half its height. At the west end is a gallery, the design of flat strap-work on the ceiling is noteworthy. Above the east door can be seen the Prince of Wales Plumes.

The principal oak staircase is original, with rectangular well, and heavily moulded bandrail and balustrade. The strap-work and decoration becomes more ornate as you reach the second floor and the principle rooms. On the ground floor, each of the doorways to the Chapel and Wilson Room (originally a dinning room) bears twelve panels and at their heads have the crest of Newton (a bore s head) and Puckering (a Stag).

Above the hall, identical in area, is the Grand Salon. Here the ceiling is enriched by pendants at some of the intersection, with a large pendant in the centre. In the west bay can be seen the initials J.R (James) and other royal devices, including the Royal Stuart Arms. Balancing this treatment, the east bays show the Prince of Wales features, the Garter and the motto Ich Dien . The marble fireplace is flanked by the figures of Vulcan and Venus.

Adjoining the Grand Salon are the Dutch Room and the White Room. The ceiling of the Dutch Room is panelled and the Friezes is modelled with foliage, fruit and jewels. The chimney-piece is of black marble. The White Room on the other side of the Grand Salon has an interesting fireplace and over mantel. The frieze above the fireplace has two subjects, the triumph of Christ and the triumph of Death. The figures in the three projections represent Piety, Mercy and Peace. The oval panel in the centre of the over mantel shows Pegasus and Perseus with the head of Modusa Pegasus. The White Room leads into the seventy foot Long Gallery. The frieze bears a design of foliage, dogs and masks, and the bold strap work of the ceiling is varied with three lozenge-shaped panels.

Alternations have been made over the years, both inside and out, by all of the owners. The original chimneys are no longer there having been replaced by mock Tudor ones. The stables block used to be of three parts now there are only two, the two remaining being are currently used as council offices. The garden house, thought to be designed by Inigo Jones, at one time used as public conveniences, is now empty.

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