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Getting Married - Wedding Venue Oxfordshire England


OxfordshireGetting Married - Wedding Venue

Wednesday 16th January 2019  


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The Great Barn

Civil Ceremonies
The Great Barn
Upper Aynho Grounds
Banbury
Oxfordshire
OX17 3AY
England

tel:- +44 1869 810 823
fax:- +44 1869 810 892
web address:- www.thegreatbarn.net/
e-mail:- enquiries@thegreatbarn.net

The Great Barn :-
Venue type: 18th Century Stone Barn

Number of function rooms available for weddings: Two - The Aynho and Croughton Room

Function room names and capacities: Aynho Room which is the main meeting, greeting and bar area. Has open log fires, exposed beams and arrow slit windows. Leads out onto the gardens. The Croughton Room is licensed for civil ceremonies and can hold 140 for sit down meals, the room is also used for dancing in the evening. Informal capacity of The Great Barn is over 250, we add marquee extensions if dining for more than 140 is required.

Garden suitable for marquees: yes

Local accommodation:
The Cartwright Hotel in Aynho
Deddington Arms in Deddington

Choice of wedding breakfast menus - Yes
Alcohol License - Yes
Toastmaster Available - Yes
Entertainment Available - Yes
Dedicated wedding planner available - Yes
Licensed for Civil Ceremonies - Yes
Outdoor Fireworks Permitted - Yes
Dance Floor - Yes
Evening Reception Facilities - Yes
Car Parking Facilities - Yes

Tables chairs linens and tableware included

Entertainment is available: Discos, bands etc

Wedding services provided: Civil Ceremonies and receptions. Flexible catering, exclusive use of 18th century barn and 250 acre wooded estate including trout lakes for photographic back drops. Master of ceremonies and full wedding planning included.

Gardens or outside locations suitable for wedding photography: Yes 250 acres of wooded estate including beautiful lakes for photographic back drops.

Suitable locations inside the venue for wedding photography: Fire place setting and exposed beams and stone walls make fantastic backdrops for photographs if the weather is bad.

Local picturesque areas suitable for wedding photography: Every where.

Venue special features: Traditional 18th century stone barn, open log fires, exposed stone walls and beams, arrow slit windows and wooden floor in the main dining and dancing area. The barn has been sympathetically converted to retain many of its original charm, along with the beautiful arrow slit windows, natural stone 2 foot thick walls and exposed beams, The Great Barn has a gothic feel that alot of venues lack. Decoration of The Great Barn includes original historic tapestries based on the theme of King Arthur and The Knights of the Round Table.

Venue History: Converted by the Stephenson Family in 1986, set in rolling wooded hills on the Northamptonshire/Oxfordshire border. It was traditionally used as farm storage buildings and was originally built in 1770 as part of The Cartwright Estate. It has stunning views and is surrounded by 250 acres of wooded estate, with three large trouts which provide fantastic back drops for wedding pictures.

Other information: The Great Barn comprises The Aynho and Croughton Room which are both licensed for civil ceremonies. The Croughton Room is also the main dining and dancing area with its natural wooden floor. Once the ceremony is finished, guests make their way through to The Aynho Room for drinks, canapes and photographs whilst The Croughton Room is prepared for The Wedding Breakfast. Both barns have beautiful exposed beams and arrow slit windows with The Aynho Room boasting two open log fires. There are two minstrel galleries, one small one in The Croughton Room and a larger one in The Aynho Room. These galleries make excellent areas for photographers to take large group photos and for quartets to play.

Recommended by Photographer:- Stuart Bebb CRSWPP ASWPP


Wedding Trivia:
SOMETHING "OLD", "NEW", "BORROWED", AND "BLUE"
The tradition of carrying one or more items that are "old", "new", "borrowed" and "blue" also comes from English. There is an old English rhyme describing the practice which also mentions a sixpence in the brides shoe. Something old, signifying continuity, could be a piece of lace, jewelry, or a grandmother's handkerchief. Something new, signifying optimism in the future, could be an article of clothing or the wedding rings. Something borrowed, signifying future happiness, could be handkerchief from a happily married relative or friend. Something blue, signifying modesty, fidelity and love, comes from early Jewish history. In early Biblical times, blue not white symbolized purity. Both the bride and groom usually wore a band of blue material around the bottom of their wedding attire, hence the tradition of "something blue". Originally the sixpence was presented to the bride by her future husband as a token of his love. Today, very often, it is the bride's father who places a coin in the brides shoe prior to leaving home for the church.

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