Wedding Plans

 

Wedding Cakes – Having your cake and eating it 

For some, eating a piece of fruit wedding cake at a wedding is the highlight of the reception. Yet for others, they would rather not have a cake at all.

The choice of cake is not just about taste alone. Traditional cakes can also be extremely expensive so couple doubts about taste and cost and you have two good reasons why you may wish to not to have a cake.

Wedding cakes are another great wedding tradition, making some people believe that you have to have a cake even of you don't like it. This is not the case. There are plenty of alternatives, including nothing at all.

There are plenty of alternatives to consider in your weeding cake which are not just limited to the. Icings, cream fillings and other variations of fillings.

So please take a few minutes to take the various ideas on board before plunging into your choice. Also remember if you do decide to have a full fruit cake to ensure that your venue returns the remaining cake after the event. After all you may want to keep some of it to celebrate the birth of your first child!

Interestingly not getting the rest of the wedding cake returned safely by the venue is often one the main complaint after the happy day is over. So clearly many catering staff enjoys eating wedding cake too.

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Wedding Trivia:SOMETHING "OLD", "NEW", "BORROWED", AND "BLUE"
The tradition of carrying one or more items that are "old", "new", "borrowed" and "blue" also comes from English. There is an old English rhyme describing the practice which also mentions a sixpence in the brides shoe. Something old, signifying continuity, could be a piece of lace, jewelry, or a grandmother's handkerchief. Something new, signifying optimism in the future, could be an article of clothing or the wedding rings. Something borrowed, signifying future happiness, could be handkerchief from a happily married relative or friend. Something blue, signifying modesty, fidelity and love, comes from early Jewish history. In early Biblical times, blue not white symbolized purity. Both the bride and groom usually wore a band of blue material around the bottom of their wedding attire, hence the tradition of "something blue". Originally the sixpence was presented to the bride by her future husband as a token of his love. Today, very often, it is the bride's father who places a coin in the brides shoe prior to leaving home for the church.