Wedding Plans

The photographs that may be taken

Gordan McGowan Scotland PhotographerThere are several types of photographs, which will be taken at your wedding. a: The traditional  groups, close-ups, long shots, etc. from which you chose the minimum number for which you have contracted and b: the specially requested photographs which you have asked to be taken c: photojournalistic images which are at the discretion of the photographer. 

The photojournalistic images are very individual and it is best to look closely at what the photographer has done in the past to see if the style is in keeping with what you have in mind.  Do remember though that exact replicas of images that you have seen may not be possible as each and every occasion is very different.

So now we come to the photographs, which 'may' be taken. We must though  draw your attention to that word 'may'? It is impossible to say definitely that a picture will be taken as weddings are so un predictable - guests not being present or 'disappearing' when they are needed or  vicars being uncooperative, etc. However, your photographer will be doing his best to take everything that is expected of him or her.

Generally the story begins at the Brides home, so it is best to decide what photographs you want well in advance.  Remember that delays can be caused by hair stylists or florists who arrive late, not to mention the bridesmaids and matron of honor!  Then, on the morning of your wedding day before your photographer arrives you should look around the room and remove anything, which you would not want to appear in the photographs?

The next opportunity for photographs is at the church, your photographer will want to capture images of the Groom and Bestman along with the Ushers and other principle guests, such as the Brides Parents, The Grooms Parents and perhaps even the Grandparents



As you will realize weddings can be emotional occasions so 'we' have to be carefully avoid upsetting people. So at the pre-wedding chat your photographer will ask you about parents being present and if there is any 'stand-in' for any parent who may not be. However, it is important that you make sure that you tell 'stand-ins' that you have chosen them so that they know this before 'the day'.  The photographer will ask you about divorced parents, step parents and if you wish them to be photographed.

Wedding etiquette does allow estranged partners not to stand next to each other or even be photographed together.

Post by Phil Jones

Photo Quote: There comes a point where you see it all as completely empty being a popular artist to the extent that people who are not necessarily interested in art know about things or take some little interest. I think that now for me it's a burden. It's a bit hard to deal with and it wastes time as well. - David Hockney

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Wedding Trivia:SHOES TO THE CAR
This tradition originated in England during the Tudor period. At that time, guests would throw shoes at the bride and groom as they left in their carriage. It was considered good luck if their carriage was hit. Today, more often than not, it is beverage cans that are tied to a couples car instead of shoes. It should also be noted that the English consider it good luck if it rains on their wedding day!